<body><script type="text/javascript"> function setAttributeOnload(object, attribute, val) { if(window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }, false); } else { window.attachEvent('onload', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }); } } </script> <div id="navbar-iframe-container"></div> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> gapi.load("gapi.iframes:gapi.iframes.style.bubble", function() { if (gapi.iframes && gapi.iframes.getContext) { gapi.iframes.getContext().openChild({ url: 'https://www.blogger.com/navbar.g?targetBlogID\x3d24605170\x26blogName\x3dWhat\x27s+New\x26publishMode\x3dPUBLISH_MODE_BLOGSPOT\x26navbarType\x3dBLUE\x26layoutType\x3dCLASSIC\x26searchRoot\x3dhttp://newsko.blogspot.com/search\x26blogLocale\x3den_US\x26v\x3d2\x26homepageUrl\x3dhttp://newsko.blogspot.com/\x26vt\x3d-8578980419657163974', where: document.getElementById("navbar-iframe-container"), id: "navbar-iframe" }); } }); </script>
   What's New[definition].  
 
    
Google
Google Web
« Home

Posts

Yahoo's free software turns PC into DVR
Cars that get 100 miles per gallon
MySQL CEO offers mixed view of Oracle
Google 'G-Drive' Vs. Microsoft 'Live Drive'
Hotmail's new address
When digital kids rule the classroom
Seagate Unveils 750-GB Hard Drive
Win on Mac: A Sign of the Apocalypse?
Top 10 Windows XP Tips Of All Time
Oracle's big Linux decision: develop or buy
 
     Archives
March 2006
April 2006
May 2006
June 2006
July 2006
 
     Links




Word of the Day

Article of the Day

This Day in History

In the News

Quotation of the Day

Microsoft Expands Antipiracy Initiatives

Microsoft Expands Antipiracy Initiatives
April 26, 2006 2:05PM

Rob Ayoub, an analyst at Frost & Sullivan, said that Microsoft's increasingly severe crackdown on piracy might actually serve to further the spread of viruses and other malicious software. "The more of this cracking down on piracy that they do, the more they will keep people who have pirated copies from updating," he said.

Microsoft has given software pirates a little more to worry about, following the announcement this week that it has begun to widen the scope of its Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program to include checks for the authenticity of Microsoft Office software. The company also has made changes to WGA to broaden the reach of its Windows XP verifications.

Currently in the pilot-testing phase, the new Office Genuine Advantage (OGA) service notifies Microsoft Office users whether their software fell off the back of a truck or is authentic.

Microsoft has not said where pilot users for the program are located or how many are participating, and the company has declined to say when the program will reach North America.

Real or Faux

Also beginning this week, some users of Windows XP in the U.S. who have signed up for Microsoft's automatic updates and have granted the company the ability to do WGA checks might be presented with an alarming notice.

After installation and a system reboot, users who have an illegitimate copy of Windows XP will be greeted with a message that reads: "This copy of Windows is not genuine; you may be a victim of software counterfeiting."

The notice directs users to a WGA site on which they can "learn the benefits of genuine software." The reminders will continue until a genuine copy of the OS has been installed.

"Microsoft is clearly interested in maximizing its revenues for XP and minimizing piracy," said Andrew Jaquith, a Yankee Group analyst. "They are gradually turning the screws on people who don't register with WGA."

Since the its launch in 2005, Windows users have had the option to register for the WGA program if they wanted to receive automatic security updates and other free goodies from Microsoft's site.

However, according to Microsoft, the program might become compulsory for users later this year. Those who have not validated their software through WGA will not be able to download Internet Explorer 7 and Windows Defender, among other applications.

Crackdown Threat

The Business Software Alliance estimates that some 35 percent of all PC software used worldwide is counterfeit. In addition, a recent IDC study predicted that reducing piracy by 10 percent over the next four years could add 2.4 million new jobs and $400 billion in economic growth to the global economy.

While these figures might be alarming, at least one expert is concerned about a massive antipiracy initiative. Rob Ayoub, an analyst at Frost & Sullivan, said that Microsoft's increasingly severe crackdown on piracy might actually serve to further the spread of viruses and other malicious software.

"The more of this cracking down on piracy that they do, the more they will keep people who have pirated copies from updating," he said. "That increases proliferation of security problems and, to my mind, that is the biggest problem."

Ayoub said that, once users turn off the automatic-update feature in Windows -- no matter the reason -- there will be more and more unpatched machines vulnerable to malicious attack. "As much as I respect Microsoft's stand on piracy," Ayoub said, "I don't think this is the right way to handle it."

Microsoft Expands Antipiracy Initiatives - Wednesday, April 26, 2006 -

Post a Comment

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner



 


Linux Tips and Tricks - Mox Diamond - Arcane Denial - Sylvan Library
Linux Tips and Stuff - ba-zoo-ra - iBUG teks/

© 2006 What's New